Greetings SPTS Members and IJSPT Subscribers!


 
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The IJSPT editorial staff announces that the February 2013 issue of the International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy (IJSPT) is now available online! In this issue, you will find articles in various categories to assist in your quest for evidence-based information that will promote excellence in your clinical practice.

In This Issue

Call for Papers

Issue Access

Original Research

Case Report

Clinical Commentary: Diagnostics Corner

Clinical Commentary: Diagnostics Corner

Clinical Commentary: Diagnostics Corner

 

Call for Papers

Now it's your turn! 
A journal can only be as good as the information contained within it.  We invite you to actively participate in the growth and development of your journal.  The Editorial Board is looking for your very best in quality research, clinical commentaries, systematic reviews of the literature, case reports, and clinical suggestions.  Guidelines for submission as well as for each category of submission have been developed and posted on the IJSPT web site.  By publishing in the International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy, you'll not only share knowledge with your colleagues, but you'll also contribute to raising the level of professionalism in the practice of sports physical therapy worldwide. 

All submissions must be sent through the online submission portal.  

 

Enhance Your Practice!

Access this issue of the

International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy today to enhance your practice of sports physical therapy.  The

IJSPT has received recognition and full indexing in the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database.  This will not only allow additional archiving of published manuscripts, but also provide international access for our colleagues around the world. 


 

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Contact Us

International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy
Sports Physical Therapy Section
9002 N. Meridian, Suite 112A
Indianapolis, Indiana 46260
877.732.5009

 Manuscripts and submission information 

 

Greetings SPTS Members and IJSPT Subscribers!

LINK available online!   

We invite you to actively participate in the growth and development of your journal. The Editorial Board is looking for your very best in quality research, clinical commentaries, systematic reviews of the literature, case reports, and clinical suggestions. Guidelines for submission for each category of submission are available on the IJSPT web site. By publishing in the International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy, you'll not only share knowledge with your colleagues, but you'll also contribute to raising the level of professionalism in the practice of Sports Physical Therapy worldwide. Try out the new online submission system.  

Sincerely,

The IJSPT Editorial Staff 

 

 

 

Original Research 

 

The influence of heel height on vertical ground reaction force during landing tasks in recreationally active and athletic collegiate females.

 

Authors: Lindenberg KM, Carcia CR

Increased vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF) during landing are theorized to increase ACL injury risk in female athletes. The purpose of this study was to determine if heel height alters vGRFs when landing from a forward hop or drop landing. The authors concluded that the addition of a 24mm heel lift to the bottom of a sneaker significantly alters peak vGRF upon landing from a unilateral forward hop but not from a jumping maneuver.

 

 

Immediate effects of cryotherapy on static and dynamic balance.

Authors: Douglas M, Bivens S, Pesterfield J, Clemson N, Castle W, Sole G, Wassinger C

Cryotherapy is commonly used in physical therapy with many known benefits; however several investigations have reported decreased functional performance following therapeutic application thereof. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of cryotherapy applied to the ankle on static and dynamic standing balance. No statistically significant differences (and low effect sizes) in static balance indices were found between the post-cryotherapy and the control conditions. Dynamic medial-lateral (ML) indices significantly increased following the cryotherapy application. No differences were noted between experimental and control conditions for the dynamic anterior-posterior (AP) or overall balance indices while a small effect size was noted for both. Overall, the results suggest that cryotherapy to the ankle has a negative effect on the ML component of dynamic balance following ice water immersion. Therefore, immediate return to play following cryotherapy application is cautioned given the decreased dynamic ML balance and potential for increased injury risk.

 

Effects of a 6-week whole body vibration training on the reflex response of the ankle muscles: a randomized controlled trial.

Authors: Martinez F, Rubio J, Ramos DJ, Estaban P, Mendizabal S, Jimenez F

The ligament sprain of the lateral ankle is the most frequent injury that occurs when participating in sports. Whole body vibration (WBV) is a training method that has been recently introduced as a rehabilitative tool for treatment of athletes. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a 6 week WBV training program on the reflex response mechanism of the peroneus longus (PL), peroneus brevis (PB), and anterior tibialis (AT) muscles in ankle inversion at 30 degrees from horizontal, in a static position. After 6 weeks of WBV training, there were no significant changes in the reflex response times among the muscles tested.

 

The acute effects of two passive stretch maneuvers on pectoralis minor length and scapular kinematics among collegiate swimmers.

Authors: Williams J, Laudner K, McLoda T

The purpose of this descriptive repeated measures study was to compare the acute effects of two passive stretches on pectoralis minor length and scapular kinematics among a group of collegiate swimmers. The gross shoulder stretch program had a significant increase in pectoralis minor length as compared to a focal stretch and a control group. Overall results revealed no acute improvements of scapular upward rotation, external rotation, or posterior tilt of the scapula after the application of either passive stretch maneuver performed on the pectoralis minor muscle.

 

Functional vs. strength training in adults: specific needs define the best intervention.

Authors: Pacheco MM, Teixeira LAC, Franchini E, Takito MY

In the past, studies that have aimed to compare different strategies to improve functional capacity have produced controversial results. Furthermore, such studies have focused solely on dependent individuals. In contrast, the present study aimed to compare traditional training to functional training for independent individuals. The purpose was to compare traditional training to functional training in healthy and independent middle-aged adults and elderly subjects. When the entire sample was considered, no differences in improvement existed between the two training protocols. However, when the specific groups were analyzed, functional training was less effective for women compared to men and compared to women in the conventional group. Therefore, some individuals may require additional basic training before practicing more specific training protocols.

 

Development of a physical performance assessment checklist for athletes who sustained a lower extremity injury in preparation for return to sport: a Delphi study.

Authors: Haines S, Baker T, Donaldson M

The purpose of this study was to develop consensus on the critical constructs necessary for inclusion in a physical performance assessment checklist (PPAC) that could be used to assess an athlete's readiness to return to sport following a lower extremity injury. The study used 3-rounds of Delphi methodology to finalize the PPAC originally developed by a panel of experts. Throughout the 3-rounds, 10 initial constructs were modified and revised to produce the finalized PPAC consisting of 12 constructs necessary to consider an athlete's readiness to return to sport after a lower extremity injury. This instrument can be used as a checklist to advocate for prospective batteries of physical performance tests that incorporate the elements identified by this study.

 

 

 

Case Report

 

Comprehensive post-arthroscopic management of a middle aged adult with glenohumeral osteoarthritis: a case report.

Authors: Hagen ND, Olsen T, Millett P

Comprehensive arthroscopic management (CAM) is a new glenohumeral debridement procedure developed as a joint preserving alternative to total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). The procedure consists of several arthroscopic components. This case report focuses upon an active, middle-aged patient who failed physical therapy treatment and corticosteroid injections for glenohumeral osteoarthritis. The patient was not an ideal candidate for TSA because of her age, activity level, and concern for implant survival; therefore surgical intervention was performed using the CAM procedure. Details concerning the rehabilitation protocol are outlined as well as patient outcomes. For patients less than 55 years of age diagnosed with severe glenohumeral osteoarthritis, the CAM procedure and intensive, motion focused therapy present a promising treatment combination. 

 

 

 

Clinical Commentary

 

Dynamic neuromuscular stabilization & sports rehabilitation

Authors: Frank C, Kobesova A, Kolar P

Dynamic neuromuscular (core) stability is necessary for optimal athletic performance and is not achieved purely by adequate strength of abdominals, spinal extensors, gluteals or any other musculature; rather, core stabilization is accomplished through precise coordination of these muscles and intra-abdominal pressure regulation by the nervous system. Understanding developmental kinesiology provides a framework to appreciate regional interdependence and the interlinking of the skeleton, joints, musculature during movement and the importance of training both the dynamic and stabilizing function of muscles in the kinetic chain. The Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS) approach provides functional tools to assess and activate the intrinsic spinal stabilizers in order to optimize the movement system for both prehabiliation and rehabilitation of athletic injuries as well as performance enhancement.

 

 

 

Clinical Commentary: Diagnostics Corner

 

Vascular thoracic outlet in a competitive swimmer: a case report.

Author: Nitz AJ, Nitz JA

Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a well-described condition resulting from compression of the brachial plexus, subclavian artery, and/or vein. Though symptoms of pain, numbness, tingling and signs of muscular weakness associated with this condition usually begin insidiously, on rare occasions the presentation is of acute onset and may represent an acute vascular compression. An unusual form of "effort" thrombosis of the subclavian vein may require emergency care in order to ensure controlled clot lysis and thrombus dissolution. This case report presents a competitive swimmer who developed an acute onset of limb cyanosis during training.

 

 

 

Clinical Commentary: On the Sidelines

 

Sideline management of acute dislocation of the glenohumeral joint: a unique approach to athlete self-reduction.

Authors: Smith D, Hoogenboom BJ

The acute anterior dislocation of the glenohumeral joint (GHJ) poses a challenge to sports medicine providers at all levels and in all settings. Quick and effective relocation of the GHJ is an important skill for on the sideline or on the field management of this type of dislocation when appropriate and allowable by facility protocol. This clinical suggestion describes one possible technique for athlete self-reduction that may be appropriate in some circumstances.

 

 

 

Redigeret af : Simon Hagbarth, 29.01.2017

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